Gear Review! Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Handcuffs!

 

My name is Preston. I’ve been a security professional for approximately 14 years in all types of security and all type of companies.

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Let’s talk handcuffs–one of the most basic ideas ever developed for public safety in my opinion. Sure, it’s been streamlined and slightly modified, but all in all it hasn’t changed much from its original design.

The modern handcuff is usually comprised of the box—with the locking teeth, lock, key hole and where the two cuffs are connected either by chain or a hinge. You have the double strand, that connects the box to the single strand allowing the “cuff” action to happen. And the single strand which is the fun part we all play with by spinning it and hearing that ever so satisfying “zzzt” sound.

Ok so quick history lesson, there will be a quiz at the end…… just kidding. The patent was first submitted by George Caveney on June 1st, 1910. In all reality, not that long ago.

Now I’m not going to get into a debate on which handcuff is best (Peerless for me) but it really is a personal choice. I used to carry other brands but was not a fan of the sliding lock system. The handcuffs I use now have a push button lock that make it easy for me.

When carrying a pair, I personally mirror them as I put them together in my holster. By mirror I mean putting the actual key hole against the key hole with single strands facing the same way.

I practiced day in and day out pulling my cuffs out and swinging them–not like in a large arc but some of you longtime PSOs know what I mean. This is so I could handcuff with one swoop and look right doing it.

My suggestion is to practice with your handcuffs any chance you can. Talk with your supervisor about having quarterly meetings focused just on handcuffing and proper technique if subject is standing or on the ground. In our practice drills we had 8 seconds to use them on a subject, properly and safely.

A lot can happen out there in a short amount of time.

So TRAINING TRAINING TRAINING with the tools you use is important.

If your company doesn’t provide you with enough training time we need to fix that or find a new company. Our companies NEED to care about our personal safety!

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